Tag Archives: Buddhism

Quotes by Pema Chodron “Gloriousness and wretchedness need each other. One inspires us, the other softens us.”

Quotes by Pema Chodron

1.  “There’s a reason you can learn from everything: you have basic wisdom, basic intelligence, and basic goodness.”

2.  “A further sign of health is that we don’t become undone by fear and trembling, but we take it as a message that it’s time to stop struggling and look directly at what’s threatening us.”

3.  “Gloriousness and wretchedness need each other. One inspires us, the other softens us.”

4.  “Every moment is unique, unknown, completely fresh.”

5.  “Better to join in with humanity than to set ourselves apart.”

6.  “Enlightenment is a direct experience with reality.”

7.  “We can drop the fundamental hope that there is a better me who one day will emerge. We can’t just jump over ourselves as if we were not there.”

8.  “The truth you believe and cling to makes you unavailable to hear anything new.”

9.  “…Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.”

10.  “It isn’t the things that are happening to us that cause us to suffer, it’s what we say to ourselves about the things that are happening.”

11.  “Meditation practice isn’t about trying to throw ourselves away or become something better. It’s about befriending who we are already.”

12.  “Pain is not a punishment; pleasure is not a reward.”

13.  “As we practice, we begin to know the difference between our fantasy and reality.”

14.  “Sometimes we find that we like our thoughts so much that we don’t want to let them go.”

15.  “The essence of practice is always the same: instead of falling prey to a chain reaction of revenge or self-hatred, we gradually learn to catch the emotional reaction and drop the story lines.”

16.  “Only to the extent that we expose ourselves over and over to annihilation can that which is indestructible in us be found.”

17.  “If we learn to open our hearts, anyone, including the people who drive us crazy, can be our teacher.”

18.  “Feeling irritated, restless, afraid, and hopeless is a reminder to listen more carefully.”

19.  “We work on ourselves in order to help others, but also we help others in order to work on ourselves.”

20.  “When we scratch the wound and give into our addictions we do not allow the wound to heal.”

21.  “We don’t set out to save the world; we set out to wonder how other people are doing and to reflect on how our actions affect other people’s hearts.”

23.  “A thoroughly good relationship with ourselves results in being still, which doesn’t mean we don’t run and jump and dance about. It means there’s no compulsiveness. We don’t overwork, overeat, oversmoke, overseduce. In short, we begin to stop causing harm.”

24.  “Everything is material for the seed of happiness, if you look into it with inquisitiveness and curiosity. The future is completely open, and we are writing it moment to moment. There always is the potential to create an environment of blame — or one that is conducive to loving-kindness.”

25.  “What’s encouraging about meditation is that even if we shut down, we can no longer shut down in ignorance. We see very clearly that we’re closing off. That in itself begins to illuminate the darkness of ignorance.”

26.  “Now is the only time. How we relate to it creates the future. In other words, if we’re going to be more cheerful in the future, it’s because of our aspiration and exertion to be cheerful in the present. What we do accumulates; the future is the result of what we do right now.”

27.  “When you begin to touch your heart or let your heart be touched, you begin to discover that it’s bottomless, that it doesn’t have any resolution, that this heart is huge, vast, and limitless. You begin to discover how much warmth and gentleness is there, as well as how much space.”… More

Buddha on the Brain

Quotes by The Dalai Lama

  1. “Be kind whenever possible. It is always possible.”
  2. “I find hope in the darkest of days, and focus in the brightest. I do not judge the universe.”
  3. “Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive.”
  4. “There is no need for temples, no need for complicated philosophies. My brain and my heart are my temples; my philosophy is kindness.”
  5. “If you can, help others; if you cannot do that, at least do not harm them.”
  6. “In the practice of tolerance, one’s enemy is the best teacher.”
  7. “We can never obtain peace in the outer world until we make peace with ourselves.”
  8. “If you have a particular faith or religion, that is good. But you can survive without it.”
  9. “If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.”
  10. “There is a saying in Tibetan, ‘Tragedy should be utilized as a source of strength.’
  11. “No matter what sort of difficulties, how painful experience is, if we lose our hope, that’s our real disaster.”
  12. “Remember that the best relationship is one in which your love for each other exceeds your need for each other.”
  13. “Silence is sometimes the best answer.”
  14. “Know the rules well, so you can break them effectively.”
  15. “Remember that sometimes not getting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck.”
  16. “Judge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it.”
  17. “If you can cultivate the right attitude, your enemies are your best spiritual teachers because their presence provides you with the opportunity to enhance and develop tolerance, patience and understanding.”
  18. “People take different roads seeking fulfillment and happiness. Just because they’re not on your road doesn’t mean they’ve gotten lost.”
  19. “Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk.”
  20. “We can live without religion and meditation, but we cannot survive without human affection.”
  21. “The more you are motivated by Love, The more Fearless & Free your action will be.”
  22. “When you realize you’ve made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it.”
  23. “If you have fear of some pain or suffering, you should examine whether there is anything you can do about it. If you can, there is no need to worry about it; if you cannot do anything, then there is also no need to worry.”
  24. “Love and Compassion are the true religions to me. But to develop this, we do not need to believe in any religion.”
  25. “The way to change others’ minds is with affection, and not anger.”
  26. “respective of whether we are believers or agnostics, whether we believe in God or karma, moral ethics is a code which everyone is able to pursue.”
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Pema Chödrön

Pema Chödrön was born Deirdre Blomfield-Brown in 1936, in New York City. She attended Miss Porter’s School in Connecticut and graduated from the University of California at Berkeley. She taught as an elementary school teacher for many years in both New Mexico and California. Pema has two children and three grandchildren.

While in her mid-thirties, Pema traveled to the French Alps and encountered Lama Chime Rinpoche, with whom she studied for several years. She became a novice nun in 1974 while studying with Lama Chime in London. His Holiness the Sixteenth Karmapa came to England at that time, and Pema received her ordination from him.

Pema first met her root teacher, Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, in 1972. Lama Chime encouraged her to work with Rinpoche, and it was with him that she ultimately made her most profound connection, studying with him from 1974 until his death in 1987. At the request of the Sixteenth Karmapa, she received the full monastic ordination in the Chinese lineage of Buddhism in 1981 in Hong Kong.

Pema served as the director of Karma Dzong, in Boulder, until moving in 1984 to rural Cape Breton, Nova Scotia to be the director of Gampo Abbey. Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche asked her to work towards the establishment of a monastery for western monks and nuns.

Pema currently teaches in the United States and Canada and plans for an increased amount of time in solitary retreat under the guidance of Venerable Dzigar Kongtrul Rinpoche.

 … More

Dalai Lama

His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, was born on July 6, 1935 to a peasant family in the small village of Taktser in northeastern Tibet and was recognized at the age of two as the reincarnation of His predecessor, the Thirteenth Dalai Lama. The Dalai Lamas are the manifestations of the Buddha of Compassion, who chose to take rebirth to serve humanity. Dalai Lama means Ocean of Wisdom; Tibetans normally refer to His Holiness asYizhin Norbu, the Wish-Fulfilling Gem, or simply Kundun the Presence.

In 1937 high lamas and dignitaries were sent throughout Tibet to search for the reincarnated Dalai Lama. In Takster they found such a place, as was visioned, and went to the house, with Kewtsang Rinpoche disguised as a servant and a junior monk posing as the leader. The Rinpoche was wearing a rosary of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama and the little boy, recognizing it, demanded that it be given to him. This was promised, if the child could guess who the wearer was. The reply was Sera aga (in the local dialect, a monk of Sera). The boy was also able to tell who the real leader and servant were. After many further tests, the Dalai Lama was enthroned in 1940.

His Holiness began his monastic education at the age of six.  The curriculum consisted of five major and five minor subjects.  The major subjects were logic, Tibetan art and culture, Sanskrit, medicine, and Buddhist philosophy which was further divided into a further five categories: Prajnaparimita, the perfection of wisdom; Madhyamika, the philosophy of the middle Way; Vinaya, the canon of monastic discipline; Abidharma, metaphysics; and Pramana, logic and epistemology.  The five minor subjects were poetry, music and drama, astrology, motre and phrasing, and synonyms.

In 1950, at the age of sixteen and still facing nine more years of intensive religious education, His Holiness had to assume full political power when China invaded Tibet. In March of 1959, during the national uprising of the Tibetan people against Chinese military occupation, He went into exile. Since then He has lived in the Himalayan foothills in Dharamsala, India, the seat of the Tibetan Government-in-exile, a constitutional democracy since 1963.

Meanwhile, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, unlike His predecessors who never came to the West, continues His world-wide travels, eloquently speaking in favor of ecumenical understanding, kindness and compassion, respect for the environment and, above all, world peace.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama is a man of peace.  In 1989 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his non-violent struggle for the liberation of Tibet.  He has consistently advocated policies of non-violence, even in the face of extreme aggression. He also became the first Nobel Laureate to be recognized for his concern for global environmental problems.  His Holiness has also authored more than 72 books.

His Holiness describes himself as a simple Buddhist monk.… More

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